FUELAB Event Schedule 2016

FUELAB will be displaying at these events in 2016. If you are there please stop by – it would be great to meet you!

RACING EVENTS

Drag Start

NMCA & NMRA

8th Annual NMRA NMCA All-Star Nationals – Atlanta Dragway – Commerce, GA  – April 7th-10th, 2016

15th Annual NMCA Blue Grass Nationals – Beech Bend Raceway Park – Bowling Green, KY – May 12th-16th, 2016

11th Annual NMRA NMCA Super Bowl of Street Legal Drag Racing – Route 66 Raceway – Joliet, IL – July 28th-31st, 2016

15th Annual NMCA World Street Finals – Summit Motorsports Park – Norwalk, OH – August 25th-28th, 2016

NADM

NDS Show – Kearney Raceway Park – Kearney, NE – April 22nd,23rd, and 24th, 2016

Haisley Thunder in Muncie – Muncie Dragway – Muncie, IN – June 17th, 2016

East Coast Diesel Nationals – Numidia Dragway – Numidia, PA – July 16th, 2016

U.S. Diesel Nationals

40th Annual U.S. Diesel Truckin’ Nationals – Raceway Park – Englishtown, NJ – September 17th, 2016

TRADE SHOWS

PRI

SEMA Show – Las Vegas Convention Center – Las Vegas, NV – Nov 1st – 4th, 2016

PRI – Indiana Convention Center – Indianapolis, IN – December 8th – 10th, 2016

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Racer Build Series NMRA Mustang Build – Fuel System Install

Rob Farley - Mustang Lifting Tires01Rob Farley - Fast PartsRob Farley - Fuelab Parts

The Holidays have past and Rob Farley is back at it with his NMRA Mustang Build. The Mustang is currently running a carbureted Ford Motorsport 351 Windsor block bored and stroked to a 408 that pushes over 1,000 hp.

Rob is about to change over to an electronic fuel injection system. To be installed are a FAST EFI system #30400, a FUELAB EFI in-line fuel pressure regulator 52501-2, FUELAB fuel pre-filter #81833-2 10an, FUELAB fuel post-filter #81823-2 10an, and FUELAB Prodigy High Pressure EFI In Line Fuel Pump #41401-2.

Stay tuned for the install article!

NMCA Racer Jenna Pierce-Wilson Talks About Drag Racing and FUELAB

Jenna Pierce

Jenna Pierce-Wilson successfully races a COPO Camaro clone built by family and friends. Her husband Jesse is heading up a project to build a second COPO Clone, which we have been covering in a Race Car Build Series of articles – see the latest installment at http://fuelab.com/race-car-build-series-building-a-copo-camaro-clone-part-3/.

Here is what Jenna had to say about drag racing and FUELAB.

Q: What got you into racing?
A: My dad got me into it. He has raced all my life so I knew about racing from a young age. He let me start racing the summer I was 14, I turned 15 that winter. My mom refused to let me race a junior dragster when I was younger so my dad waited till I was closer to 16.

Q: What was the first car you raced?
A: My dad started me in a chrome yellow 1999 Mustang GT. That was also my first car when I started driving.  It was completely stock except we put Nitto tires on the rear. It ran high 14’s in a 1/4 mile. My second time ever racing I took home runner up in this car. I ran in the street class for several years before moving on to a race car with slicks.

Q: What were some of the other cars you have raced and when?
A: After the yellow Mustang was a 2001 red Camaro Z28. I didn’t race that one long. Then a blue 2002 Mustang GT. We put nitrous on it and everything else was stock. It didn’t react well with just nitrous so we ended up pulling it off and sold the car. The last street car I raced was a black 1998 Trans Am. We only did a few mods on it including a rough tune, air intake and cooler thermostat. It would run mid 12’s. I raced that car for about 3 years and then sold it to my uncle in Florida. To this day the car is still in the family, my cousin races it, and it’s still going strong. Coincidently that car saved me from having to lose points for one of our NMCA races last year. The COPO wasn’t running so we had to park it for the Bradenton Florida race. If I didn’t race I would not get the points, so I borrowed my old car and raced it. I didn’t do so well, but I got my points.

Q: What associations have you raced in?
A: I had only raced at our local track up until 2013, when Jesse introduced us to the NMCA. We have also run in the LSX Series along with the NMCA.

Q: What have been your major racing successes over the past 5 years?
A: I have had several wins at the local track. Our first year out in the NMCA in 2013 we finished 8th in the Open Comp class getting us a top ten win. In 2014 we finished 3rd in the LSX Series 5th Generation Camaro Class. We won 2 races back to back wins that year as well. We won Norwalk and LS fest in Bowling Green. This year we won first place in Open Comp for the NMCA.

Q: What do you like most about racing?
A: The speed. The adrenaline. The fumes. Ha-ha I love the freedom. Out on that track it’s your own world.

Q: Is your family involved in your racing efforts?
A: Yes. My dad races alongside me in the NMCA. My mom is my biggest fan.

Q: How long have you used FUELAB?
A: 2 years now

Q: Why did you start using FUELAB?
A: At the time we were a new race team with a new car, and they were the only ones willing to work with us on a sponsorship. They had what we needed and they liked our car.

Q: Was there a particular problem you were having that FUELAB solved?
A: We didn’t really have any particular problem.  We needed parts and they had what we needed.

Q: How has FUELAB affected your racing success?
A: Reliability; out of all the systems on this car, the fuel system has never failed us. It works every time without any hiccups. We can count on their parts to work and not fail us.

Q: What FUELAB parts do you use?
A: We use the 51501 fuel pressure regulator, 41401 Prodigy fuel pump, and 82803/82813 fuel filters.

Q: What do you see as the primary benefits of FUELAB products and company?
A: Reliability. I can’t stress that enough.  When you have one less thing to worry about on your race car it makes a world of difference in stress relief.  They work, end of story.  Customer service is great as well.  If you have any questions, they will do everything they can to get you the answers you need. They’re a great company with amazing products.

Q: Where do you see yourself in racing in 5 years?
A: Hopefully still racing with the NMCA but getting into OSCA and some other racing. We just go season by season.

Q: What do you do in your spare time?
A: Remodeling a house right now. Ha-ha. Usually just the simple things; movies, hanging with family and friends, hanging with Jesse.

Bryant Goldstone Can Throw a Javelin 210 MPH!

Bryant Goldstone 1 Bryant Goldstone 2

We spent some time with Bryant Goldstone talking about drag racing. Here is what he had to say.

Q: When did you start racing?
A: I was 20

Q: What got you into racing?
A: I started racing informally. My friends and I had fast cars and we would go to a local track to see how fast they were. We’d race each other. We did no bracket racing at first. It got competitive and we kept working on our cars to be faster than one another. Eventually they stopped going, but I kept on bracket racing. I probably should have stopped too. I could have saved a pile of money over the years! But, I probably would have spent it on something else, and I wouldn’t have the memories of racing.

Q: What was the first car you raced?
A: I bought the ’73 Javelin out of Arizona in 1986. Initially, I did a cam change and gears. Then put in a small block Chevy in 1987. I raced that for a while, and then the car was put a side burner for many years. I got a Bickel Pro Style car – it was a ’98 Monte Carlo. I raced that car from ’99 to ’03. Then I raced the Javelin again in NMCA Pro Street. I also raced my Chevelle – I did four Hot Rod Drag Weeks. Then I built the Javelin for Unlimited, and then went to Ultimate Iron. Now the Javelin runs a 572 ci Big Block Chevy built by my father in law, Norm Beerhorst, at Ultratech. It has twin 88 turbos and puts out about 2500 horsepower with 26 pounds of boost. We raced it a bit in 2014, but had some engine problems. 2015 has been the first full of racing with this engine. We have run 6.78 second quarter mile at 210 mph.

Q: What are some of the associations/Series have you raced in?
A: The NMCA, NSCA, Hot Rod Drag Week, Super Chevy Fast Street Car Shoot Out.

Q: What have been your major racing successes over the past 5 years?
A: I feel my most major racing success was this year. I finished in second place at Drag Week, and first in my class. I had been hoping to be on the podium. This was a killer accomplishment. In 2009 I won Pinks All Out Quick 8. I won my class at Drag Week in 2012 or ’13 with the Chevelle – I did a seven second pass on a drag radial.

Q: What do you like most about racing?
A: I like the speed and the thrill. Though getting the car ready is a lot of work for 65 seconds of racing! I ask myself why I keep going back? I guess the answer is that it’s hard to stop. It’s like a drug.

Q: Is your family involved in your racing efforts?
A: My father in law builds my engines. My wife grew up with drag racing, so she is onboard. She has never objected!

Q: How long have you used FUELAB?
A: I’ve used FUELAB for a couple of years. I was running it while we did testing in 2014, and in 2015 we did well with it.

Q: Why did you start using FUELAB?
A: My father in law recommended we use FUELAB. He met a FUELAB rep at the PRI Show and found their parts provided the quality and performance we were looking for. We also liked the idea of the variable speed control of the Prodigy fuel pumps.

Q: Was there a particular problem you were having that FUELAB solved?
A: We were looking for a lower cost pump with great performance. With FUELAB we found we could get better performance from a less expensive pump!

Q: How has FUELAB affected your racing success?
A: The pumps work great and they aren’t burning out. Plus it’s nice to have a sponsor helping out with equipment.

Q: What Fuelab parts do you use?
A: Right now we are using two Prodigy fuel pumps. Our application is pretty extreme – being a 2500-2700 horsepower 572 ci twin turbocharged V8. We found we had a fuel pressure drop, so FUELAB is currently having special motors wound for the pumps.

Q: What do you see as the primary benefits of FUELAB products and company?
A: The customer service is great, and it’s good to have a rep at the track. As for the products, they look good and are doing the job!

Q: Where do you see yourself in racing in 5 years?
A: I see doing Drag Weeks with the Javelin for at least the next 3 to 4 years. Also, Class 4 at Norwalk. Otherwise there aren’t many options for a heavy car. Besides that we’ll do car shows and tune on the car.

Q: What do you do in your spare time?
A: I don’t have any other hobbies. I race all Summer, and recoup in the Winter!

Racer Build Series – NMRA Mustang Build – Shifter Solenoid Install

Rob Farley - Mustang Lifting Tires01DSC_2295 (2)

As part of our ongoing coverage of Rob Farley’s NMRA Mustang Build we are onto the next project which is installation of a shifter solenoid for the Powerglide transmission. FYI: Last month we described his installation of an aluminum panel in the passenger footwell area on which to mount and organize electronics. You can see that at http://tinyurl.com/nbtpzz5.

Rob has a few reasons why he installed the shifter solenoid. The primary reason is safety; with the transmission shifted by a device, rather than by Rob, he can keep two hands on the steering wheel. Secondly, the shifter solenoid allows him to adjust shift points. In the past he had been shifting the car at different rpm’s to run different index classes. Using the shifter solenoid and the rpm switch, he can adjust shift points accordingly.

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Shift solenoid and hardware kit

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The bracket that the solenoid is attached to was purchased with the shifter.

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Four 1/8” thick spacers were included with the kit and two had to be used on each mounting bolt to properly align the solenoid with the shifter. With the solenoid open, Rob knew where to position it so the shifter would be engaged properly into second gear. If the adjustment were off, the shifter would either not fully engage into second gear, or the solenoid would try to push the shifter into neutral – causing damage to the shifter. Notice the space between the shifter and solenoid – Rob did not need the solenoid to have constant pressure against the shifter.

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Two wires lead from the solenoid – the red wire is connected to the 12 volt electrical system, while the black wire receives a signal from the rpm switch.

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This is the completed installation.

When the shifter is placed into first gear, the piston on the solenoid will retract. When the selected RPM has been reached, the solenoid will be released. It’s released quickly and it is loud. Rob says to keep your hands away from the shifter to avoid injury!

Check out this cool video of the shifter solenoid in action: https://youtu.be/YQTvjLaiZJY

 

 

 

 

 

 

Living the Dream – Dave Schultz Tells Us About His Drag Racing Career

dave-wally-joliet2014BigNHRA2013a copy

Q: When did you start racing?
A: I was doing some racing in the early 70’s when in the service. By 1975 I was out of the military and there was a bad economic recession going on. I was raising a family, and racing was too expensive, so I gave up for a while. I got back into it in the late 80’s.

Q: What got you into racing?
A: Back when I was a kid in the 1960’s I thought drag racing was neat and would spend my 25 cents allowance to get Super Stock Magazine. A guy down the street had a maroon 1965 Chevelle SS that he transplanted a 427 and 4-speed into, and raced NHRA. That was a big influence. Also, I watched racing on the Wide World of Sports. I was one of those kids that would draw race cars in their notebook at school. Later, I went into the service and worked in the motor pool. Everyone had fast cars and that really got me into racing. It was mainly street racing.

Q: What was the first car you raced?
A: The first car I raced was someone else’s car. It was a ’69 Road Runner with a bench seat and 4-speed. He was having problems racing it because he had to have the bench seat moved up too far and it would get in the way when he shifted into second. I didn’t have that problem, so he let me drive it.

Q: What were some of the other cars you have raced?
A: When I was in the military I had a few cars I raced – a ’71 Torino GT, a ’68 GTO, and a slime-green ’70 Duster 340. I’ve also raced a ’65 Coronet (which Dave’s son Dallas still races) that ran a 580 ci engine with a 4-speed. Now I have my Mopar wagon

Q: What associations have you raced in?
A: I raced in the Texas Outsiders in 2003, 2004 and 2005. I’ve raced in the NMCA since 2006. I raced in the Monster Mopar Weekend and then it went to the NMCA. I raced the NMCA and NHRA combined NHRA Challenge and got two Wally’s.

Q: What have been your major racing successes over the past 5 years?
A: I won Wally’s at Houston and Joliet, I won NMCA Ambassador of the Year, a couple of Class Championships in Monster Mopar Weekend, and I won the NMCA Nostalgia Super Stock Championship in 2014. I’ve raced in every NMCA race since 2007, and have been in the top 10 every year.

Q: What do you like most about racing?
A: I like the adrenaline of going down the track. I like the comradery of the pits. Some of my closest friends are in Nostalgia Super Stock. After the races are over I enjoy getting together with them and popping open a frosty and grilling Italian sausage. My eldest son races too, and I get to spend quality time with him.

Q: Is your family involved in your racing efforts?
A: My son races with me. Also, my seventeen year old daughter comes to lots of races. She says she would like to race Vitamin-C (Dave’s back-up car), but school and volley ball keep her very busy. So, no racing for her yet. My eldest daughter did some racing years ago with a ’79 Dodge Aspen 360. But then she got married and stopped racing.

Q: How long have you used FUELAB?
A: We started using FUELAB in Dallas’ car (the ’65 Coronet) in 2013, and in the wagon in 2014. Also, we are going to be rebuilding another car we raced years ago, the Texas Thug, and will be putting FUELAB into that.

Q: Why did you start using FUELAB?
A: After seeing Andy Warren’s and Doug Duell’s success with FUELAB I was interested. The reliability was very good – both guy’s always got down the track. So when Brian (FUELAB’s President) asked if I wanted to run FUELAB I had no hesitation to use it.

Q: Was there a particular problem you were having that FUELAB solved?
A: Well there wasn’t a particular problem at the time. I had been using other fuel delivery system manufacturers’ parts. Some had problems, and a couple crapped out over the years, and some were better. The system I had been running was still operating OK, but was getting long in the tooth. So, the timing of the FUELAB offer was good. My son’s car did well with FUELAB, so I put it on my wagon, and now it’s going on the Texas Thug.

Q: How has FUELAB affected your racing success?
A: It’s been reliable, and I did win a Championship last year running FUELAB. So, far it’s been great, but I haven’t used it long enough yet to tell about long-term reliability. I do have to say it is the best damn good looking fuel pump I ever used!

Q: What FUELAB parts do you use?
A: I use a FUELAB prodigy fuel pump to supply 9 lbs. of pressure to two 800 cfm carburetors. I also use FUELAB pre-filter and after filter. The pump is better fitting than others – it hides on the frame rail just great. I don’t know of anything better.

Q: Where do you see yourself in racing in 5 years?
A: You know, one of the reasons I like drag racing is because there aren’t age limits like other sports. I used to play on a softball team that had an age limit of 40 years old. When they found out I was 42 I had to quit the team. That really bothered me. I was talking to Big Daddy Don Garlits the other day, and he is 84 and still heavily involved in drag racing. That’s the way I want to be. I see myself running Nostalgia SS when I’m 70. I live and breathe drag racing. I’m living the dream. Drag racing is my whole social life.

Q: What do you do in your spare time?
A: I’m into motorcycling and have a toy hauler. I take two one week rides a year. I’ll load the up the Harley’s and drive to a destination. Then take the bikes for day trips. I also have five kids and three grandchildren, and I spend time with them. I piddle around in the shop, and have thirty one collector cars – I swap off driving those. I’m also into photography.

At 14 Andy Warren Had to Explain to His Dad How He Won a Drag Racing Trophy….

Andy Warren 1Andy Warren 2

Andy Warren tells us how he got into drag racing:

Q: When did you start racing?
A: I started racing when I was fourteen years old

Q: What got you into racing?
A: I was influenced by my family. My dad raced in the late 70’s and early 80’s, and my brother was into racing. When I was fourteen I was at a local “Outlaw” track with my brother John who was racing his Nova, and a friend who was racing his late ’70’s G-body Pontiac.  The guy just couldn’t cut a light, so I gave it a try with the Pontiac. I ended up getting runner-up for first place in our bracket. I came home with a trophy and my dad was like; “Where did that come from?” He was pretty surprised and just shook his head. I think he was more upset that he wasn’t there to see it. Then they let me start racing my mom’s ’92 Ford Tempo – I went to races every week and got invited to run bracket finals.

Q: What was the first car you raced?
A: It was the Pontiac

Q: What were some of the other cars you have raced?
A: The other car I have raced is my ’71 Caprice – which I still race today. I saw an ad for it in the paper, and knew from experience in demolition derbies that it would be tough. It only had 94,000 miles, and the ad said it was a 400. I was hoping it was a 402 big block. I went to check the car out – it was owned by an old lady. It had been her husband’s car, but he passed away, and seeing the Caprice in the garage made her sad. So she decided to sell it. Upon inspecting it I found it wasn’t the 402 big block I was hoping for, but rather a 400 small block. It was in good condition, and the price was only $1,200. So, I bought it and used it as a daily driver until 2006. I used it to go to prom, it went with me to college, and I raced it on weekends. Now it runs a 427 small block with a Turbo Hydro 350 transmission, and has cut a 10.24 second quarter mile at 128 mph.

Q: What associations have you raced in?
A: Besides the Outlaw racing, I’ve raced in the NMCA. I had known about the association since 1994, but never had the time and money to get into it. In April 2004 I wanted somewhere different to race and I saw the “Edelbrock Pro Series – Muscle Car Nationals” was being run at my home track in Bowling Green, Kentucky. I did that event and lost in the first round. Then I did the event in Memphis, Tennessee. I didn’t do any of the other events that year – I didn’t have money to do the whole circuit. I did the same thing in 2005. I started a new job in 2006, and made a lot more money. I was finally able to do the whole tour, and finished runner-up in points. In October 2007, I won the Nostalgia Muscle Car class in Memphis, and overall finished fifth in the class for 2007. In 2008, I came in second in the class overall, and in 2009 I won the Points Championship and was the series champ.

Q: What have been your major racing successes over the past 5 years?
A: In the NMCA Nostalgia Muscle Car Class I was the Series Champion in 2010 and 2011, I came in third in 2012, second in 2013. In 2014 I was the runner-up and missed the Championship by fifteen points – I was so close! So far for 2015 I have won in Florida and in Atlanta, but Bowling Green was rained out. So far this season I am undefeated.

Q: What do you like most about racing?
A: I like the adrenaline rush of acceleration – feeling those 2 or 3 G’s. I also like seeing friends at events. It’s like a family reunion.

Q: Is your family involved in your racing efforts?
A: Yes. My girlfriend comes along too.

Q: How long have you used FUELAB?
A: I started using FUELAB in 2010

Q: Why did you start using FUELAB?
A: I was building the 427 and needed an improved fuel system. I spoke with Brian at FUELAB and he got me set up. They also started sponsoring me that year.

Q: Was there a particular problem you were having that FUELAB solved?
A: I had been running fuel pumps that used motors with brushes. They would burn out every two years or so.  With FUELAB’s brushless pump I don’t have to worry about replacing it. I’ve had the same pump for six seasons!

Q: How has FUELAB affected your racing success?
A: The variable speed control of the pump keeps fuel cooler. In bracket racing I’ll do ten to twelve runs, and I don’t have to worry about the pump overheating.  Which makes the car more reliable – and reliability is the key to racing success.

Q: What Fuelab parts do you use?
A: I have a Prodigy 41404 Fuel Pump, and a by-pass style regulator. The truck I use for towing also has a FUELAB set up!

Q: What do you see as the primary benefits of FUELAB products and company?
A: In addition to what I said before, I like how FUELAB really supports the racers at NMCA events. If it wasn’t for FUELAB I probably wouldn’t be running the series.

Q: Where do you see yourself in racing in 5 years?
A: I’ve got my eye on getting into the NMCA Chevrolet Performance Stock class. It uses a sealed Chevrolet Performance crate engine. I hope to get into it within the next year or so. I’m also looking at maybe getting into the Drag Radial class.

Q: What do you do in your spare time?
A: I’m a diehard racer, and that’s where I spend most of my spare time. I’m also a musician and like to play drums. I also just got into metal detecting – you’d be amazed at what you can find underground!

David Hearn Tells Us His Drag Racing Effort is a Family Affair

David Hearn 1David Hearn 2

We spent some time with NMCA Open Comp racer David Hearn discussing  drag racing and Fuelab

Q: When did you start racing?
A: In 1998 when I was sixteen. I had a fast car and started street racing when I got my drives license.

Q: What got you into racing?
A: My girlfriend, her dad and brothers all drag raced. So that got me into it.

Q: What was the first car you raced?
A: The first car I raced at a track was my 1980 Camaro Z28. When I started I was running the quarter mile in 12 seconds flat. I eventually got it to 10.9. From 2000 to 2010 I traveled around doing many bracket races with that car.

Q: What were some of the other cars you have raced and when?
A: Early on – before I got the Camaro, I had a ’69 Impala SS 396 convertible, a ’71 Chevy C10 pickup with a 402, and ’74 GMC pickup with a 454. In the mid 2000’s I drove a ’69 Camaro Sport Coupe for another guy. I had been racing the car for 3 or 4 years and then in 2010 he called and said he was selling it. Twenty four hours later I bought it, and I still race this car. It has a 355 small block Chevy that runs methanol. The transmission is a Powerglide. It’s a basic combination that makes a lot of power. Most people assume it’s a big block because of how fast it runs – my best ET is 10.29.

Q: What associations have you raced in?
A: Well, I do a lot of big money bracket races, which are put on by different groups. I also do NHRA bracket racing in Division 3, and I race in NMCA Open Comp.

Q: What have been your major racing successes over the past five years?
A: In 2012 I won the NMCA Open Comp at the Indy World Finals. In 2014 I was the #1 Qualifier and won five consecutive races with NMCA Open Comp. Also in 2014, I won both the Pro ET Class and Super ET Class in one day at I-57 Dragway.

Q: What do you like most about racing?
A: I like the competitiveness. I also like traveling. We have a good time traveling as a family. You go to places you wouldn’t normally go. Our vacation time is devoted to racing, and we make as much of it as we can.

Q: Is your family involved in your racing efforts?
A: Absolutely. Since about 1999 or 2000 we have gone racing probably 20-30 weekends a year. In all that time my wife has only missed one race! Our six year old and one year old also travel with us. A funny story; When our youngest was born, within his first six weeks, he had already been to five different race tracks.

Q: How long have you used Fuelab?
A: I started using Fuelab in late 2010

Q: Why did you start using Fuelab?
A: I had heard about Fuelab, but didn’t know much about them. Then I saw one of their ads and that they had a local phone number. I called them out of curiosity and found they were only three miles from my house. I stopped by and struck a friendship with Brian (Paitz – the President of Fuelab). I liked their technology so I started using their parts.

Q: Was there a particular problem you were having that Fuelab solved?
A: I had been running a competitors fuel pump, and didn’t know it wasn’t big enough. I was running out of fuel toward the end of the quarter mile. So, I put on bowl extensions on the carburetor. When I changed to the Fuelab fuel pump I never took off the bowl extensions. I didn’t realize the old pump was causing the fuel starvation problem. Then one day I put on another carb that didn’t have bowl extensions and tested it on the track. It didn’t run out of fuel during the run. I didn’t need the bowl extension “band aids” after all. Not only that, it picked up a couple mph and the fuel supply was more consistent with the Fuelab pump.

Q: How has Fuelab affected your racing success?
A: I had never really looked into the NMCA before I met Brian. Fuelab was very involved with the NMCA and so I learned more about it through them and joined. If it wasn’t for Fuelab I wouldn’t have started racing in the NMCA, and I would never have won NMCA Open Comp in 2012. As for the product itself – with the Fuelab set up I can count on the car running more consistently.

Q: What Fuelab parts do you use?
A: I run their Prodigy Fuel Pump #41404, a Fuelab pre-filter and post-filter, and their blocking style regulator.

Q: What do you see as the primary benefits of Fuelab products and company? A: Fuelab is one-on-one with people. With other companies you sometimes get passed around to different people before you finally get one who wants to answer your question. Then it seems like they just give you some scripted answer and don’t really know what they are talking about. With Fuelab, you speak to the same person every time – Josh. He knows the products and he knows what he is talking about.

Q: Where do you see yourself in racing in five years?
A: I see myself doing the same thing. We enjoy what we do. I have a hectic work schedule, and my current race schedule works with it.

Q: What do you do in your spare time?
A: Right now I’m building my six year old a Junior Dragster. Also, we have an old truck that we like to work on.

Race Car Build Series – Building a COPO Camaro Clone – Part 2

This is a progress report on the COPO Camaro Clone being built by Jesse Pierce Wilson. In case you missed it, here is the intro to the build: http://fuelab.com/building-a-copo-camaro-clone/ . The vehicle started as a white 2014 Camaro V6. It’s a theft recovery, parts were missing, but the needed basics were still there. After the humiliation of being stolen and violated this Phoenix will rise from the ashes as a drag strip hero. Kudos to you Camaro!

Below are progress shots of the car stripped down and being repainted to red. The reason for the color change? Jesse says it’s just because he has a thing for red Camaros. We aren’t going to cover this part of the build in detail, however, in upcoming posts we will be covering three project segments in depth. The first project will include:

  • Roll cage install
  • Removal of the factory IRS differential and factory rear cradle/ from the car
  • Weld in control arm mounts and install new solid axle assembly
  • Fill in rear deck with sheet metal (or aluminum) to seal off the trunk area (required by NHRA when a fuel cell is being used)

So stay tuned for future segments of the COPO Camaro Clone Build!  

JPW1

Stripped down and almost ready for paint

JPW3

Some un-needed components removed. Less weight = faster!

JPW4

Doesn’t get much lighter than this…

JPW5

Red paint makes the car go faster

JPW7

Starting to look like a COPO Camaro!

NMCA Racer Steve Cox Talks About Drag Racing and Fuelab

Steve CoxSteve Cox Launch

NMCA drag racer and Fuelab user Steve Cox tells us his story.

Q: When did you start racing?
A: Well, I started racing go-karts at 8, and started drag racing motorcycles in 1965.

Q: What got you into racing?
A: My parents raced in the 1950’s, and my dad worked with Mickey Thompson and Pontiac Motor Division on their joint racing effort. That gave me the bug to start racing myself.

Q: What was the first car you raced?
A: In 1966 I ran motorcycles and also a 1955 Chevy street car with a 265. I’d put my motorcycle on the rear bumper of the Chevy and drive to the track and race both. I continued to race until 1968 when I went in the service. In 1977 I started drag racing motorcycles again, as well as drag racing street cars. In 1980 a friend and I built 1966 Chevy II and I drove it. At one point I was a track champ at Los Angeles County Raceway. I continued to race other cars and motorcycles. In 1986 I had a bad accident on a motorcycle, and decided that I needed to reduce the danger level as I was raising my daughter. So, I bought a ’64 Nova and raced that, and then also began racing the ’68 Camaro during the late ’90’s. I got rid of the Nova in 2000 and have raced the Camaro since.

Q: What associations have you raced in?
A: I’ve raced in the NHRA, AHRA, IHRA, NMCA, SCEDA, and the NMRA (motorcycles)

Q: Is your family involved in your racing efforts?
A: My daughter and her two children go to races and help out, and my wife does too

Q: How long have you used Fuelab?
A: For the last three years

Q: Why did you start using Fuelab?
A: I started using Fuelab because of its state of the art technology – other manufacturers’ parts seem antiquated

Q: Was there a particular problem you were having that Fuelab solved?
A: There wasn’t a specific problem. I run the car on alcohol, and I felt it was time to update the fuel system, and Fuelab is a much better product than that of other manufacturers

Q: How has Fuelab affected your racing success?
A: With Fuelab the car runs more consistently

Q: What Fuelab parts do you use?
A: I use a Fuelab fuel pump, a Fuelab fuel pressure regulator, and Fuelab fuel filters

Q: What do you see as the primary benefits of Fuelab products and company?
A: Fuelab has excellent customer service, and they are very knowledgeable. These days some companies are just missing the boat when it comes to good service. To me customer service is the most important aspect of a business.

Q: Where do you see yourself in racing in 5 years?
A: I see myself still driving. My grandson is 11 now, and I hope to get him in the car in the coming years.

Q: What do you do in your spare time?
A: I’m retired now. So, I stay busy with racing and family

Race Car Build Series – Building a COPO Camaro Clone

Jenna Pierce Wilson

Last week we introduced our Race Car Build Series, as well as introduced the first race vehicle that will featured; Rob Farley’s NMCA Mustang. This week we are introducing the second car that will be covered, and that is the COPO Camaro clone being built by the Pierce-Wilson family of Muncie, Indiana.

The Wilson’s are no strangers to COPO Camaro clones. Last year Jenna Pierce-Wilson raced a Fuelab sponsored 2010 replica COPO Camaro built by her husband Jesse Pierce-Wilson. She was quite successful we might add. Competing in the NMCA Chevrolet Performance LSX Challenge Series, Jenna ended up ranking 3rd in the 5th Generation Camaro Class for the 2014 season. Shameless Fuelab plug: The Camaro’s fuel delivery system featured Fuelab’s Prodigy High Pressure EFI In-Line fuel pump, a 515 series fuel pressure regulator, and a pair of 282 Series In-Line filters.

“Building a 5th Gen COPO clone isn’t a common thing, and only a handful of race teams are doing it” Jesse told us. “We wanted to show that it was possible for a small time race team with a limited budget to build a car that would be competitive in the 5th Generation Camaro class. We started with a 2010 base V6 Camaro and built a tribute COPO using notes from a GM COPO build book. The car turned out so well built that GM took notice. A high level manager from Chevrolet Performance saw it at race and thought it was the real thing. He had to check the VIN to be sure it wasn’t! Even a competing COPO owner couldn’t tell the difference. Then we saw our car posted on GM’s Instagram and Facebook pages. That was a big compliment. After a couple of races we were invited to the COPO build center in Michigan by Kurt Collins and Dr. Jamie Meyer – the Performance Marketing Manager at GM. They gave us a tour and discussed the COPO program. We were like kids in a candy store! It was really neat to be there talking to them. We never thought in a million years that something we built ourselves would get so much notice. It’s hard to believe it snowballed into this”.

“We decided to build a second COPO replica so Jenna’s dad can race it in the new NMCA Chevy Performance Stock Class” Jesse continues. “Of course I want to do some racing in it too, but the car is being built primarily with Jenna’s dad in mind. As with our previous build, we are going to rely on our basic tools, craftsmanship and ingenuity to get the job done”.

Fuelab will be covering the build of the Pierce-Wilson’s second COPO Camaro, including the installation of a Fuelab In-Tank Power Module fuel pump. So, stay tuned to the Fuelab Vehicle Builds website page (http://fuelab.com/category/vehicle-builds/) for regular updates.

 

Introducing the Race Car Build Series – A Fuelab Exclusive

Working on car image

It’s always interesting to see what goes on behind the scenes of a race car build. Fuelab is proud to be the fuel delivery system of choice for champion racers in the National Hot Rod Association, National Muscle Car Association, National Association of Diesel Motorsports, National Hotrod Diesel Association, FIA World Rallycross Championship, and others. We will be running a series of project articles that feature the vehicles of these prominent racers, and describe the build and installation of various component groups including fuel delivery systems. The articles are intended to be informative, as well as entertaining. Each will go over why the component is being installed, the goals of the project, and if appropriate; how it provides a solution to a problem the racer is experiencing.

The first race vehicle that will be featured is owned by Rob Farley. You might recognize his name – he drives a championship winning (and of course Fuelab equipped) ’98 Corvette in the NMCA LSX Challenge Series. We grilled Rob for a Fuelab Racer Profile posted last week; you can learn more about Rob and his drag racing at http://tinyurl.com/l29s7vc. However, the feature vehicle for this build article series is Rob’s 1985 Mustang GT. We can hear it now – GM fans are in an uproar! “Traitor!” they yell. Actually, Rob is a progressive kind of guy with no brand prejudice. He grew up in a Ford family, and has always raced Fords, but adopted Corvette into the fold in the early 2000’s. Rob’s family accepts him for this and they continue to celebrate Christmas together. The Mustang GT (named Christine) was purchased by Rob in the late 1980’s and has been successfully raced over the years, including winning a WALLY at Raceway Park in Top Street during the 2010 race season. The Mustang is currently running a carbureted Ford Motorsport 351 Windsor block bored and stroked to a 408 that pushes over 1,000 hp. Other modifications include a tubular front end with a coil over set up.

Rob Farley - Mustang Lifting Tires01Rob Farley - Inside MustangRob Farley - Mustang Engine

Rob plans to race “Christine” in NMRA for the 2015 season, but first is going to make a series of modifications that will increase performance and engine efficiency, improve handling, and make diagnosing electrical problems more convenient and efficient. We will be covering each of those modifications in our upcoming NMRA Mustang Build article series. So, stay tuned to the Fuelab Vehicle Builds website page (http://fuelab.com/category/vehicle-builds/) for regular updates.

LSX Series Champion Rob Farley Gives Us Insights on His Drag Racing Career

Rob Farley Rob - Launch - C Rob - Bradenton

Q: When did you start racing? How old were you?
A: I started racing in 1986, I was 18.

Q: What got you into racing?
A: The area where I grew up in New Jersey was near a track (Englishtown Raceway Park), and it seemed that every third house in our neighborhood had a race car in the driveway. On Saturday mornings I’d hear people starting up their cars to work on them. I could tell which car it was by the sound, so I’d get on my bicycle and ride over to the house and watch. When I got older I started racing too.

Q: What was the first car you raced?
A: I acquired by Grandmother’s 1969 Ford Falcon. I built the engine for it myself when I was 17 – a 302 with dual fours. It was my first engine build. I used the car on the street and for racing.

Q: What were some of the other cars you have raced?
A: Primarily I raced Mustangs. I grew up in a Ford household. I bought my first Corvette, a 1989, right after the 9/11 attack. I was a New York City police officer at the time and I wanted to get a gift for myself and also have something that let me get away from thinking about 9/11. I won it on an ebay auction. I kept it for a few years, and won four Corvette Challenge Championships.  Then I bought a 1998 Corvette Indy Pace Car replica – which I still race today. I really like this car, the colors make it stand out from other Corvette’s, and they only made 616 Pace Car Corvette’s with an automatic transmission.  I like cars that are different. I changed out the engine and drivetrain on this car to get it performing like it is today. I’ve won four Corvette Challenge Championships with this car.

Q: What associations have you raced in?
A: NHRA, NMCA, and the NMRA

Q: What have been your major recent racing successes?
A: For the last four years I’ve been racing in the LSX Series (a class in the NMCA that is four years old) and was Class Champion for the first three years. Last year I came in 7th as I was racing with a damaged torque converter and transmission.

Q: What do you like most about racing?
A: I like the travel, meeting racers from other places, and meeting up with friends – with the LSX Series it’s like going to a reunion four times a year. I also like helping other people race. I’ll volunteer to help line them up after their burnouts, and tow them to the staging lane. After they make a pass, I tow them back to the pits from the end of the track.

Q: Is your family involved in your racing efforts?
A: Sometimes. My kids are seven and nine, and they can’t travel with me because it doesn’t fit their school and sports schedule.

Q: How long have you used Fuelab?
A: Since 2011

Q: Why did you start using Fuelab?
A: I met Fuelab at an LSX event in 2011, they were displaying as a vendor there. I started asking Josh (Davis) about the products. He was very knowledgeable and had all the right answers. I was sold on their unique technology and the efficiency.

Q: Was there a particular problem you were having that Fuelab solved?
A: My fuel pump was getting older, and I wanted to replace it before it failed. So, I had been looking around for a new pump. I felt Fuelab had the best product, so I went with them.

Q: How has Fuelab affected your racing success?
A: There is no down time due to fuel delivery issues. I use Fuelab in two vehicles and the performance is flawless.

Q: What Fuelab parts do you use?
A: In the Corvette I have a Fuelab fuel pump, and regulator. I also have a (highly modified) 1985 Mustang GT that I have owned and raced since the late 80’s, and will be racing in NMRA this year. That has a Fuelab pump, regulator, and two filters.

Q: Where do you see yourself in racing in 5 years?
A: I plan to continue racing in the same manner. Traveling, seeing friends, and racing with my “racing family”. I want to continue racing the Corvette in LSX, and also race NMRA with the Mustang.

Q: What do you do in your spare time?
A: Remote control planes, RC helicopters, RC boats, RC cars. I like to do this with my nine year old son. The boats will go 60-80 mph. My son and I race RC off road trucks.

NMCA Champ Doug Duell Talks About Racing and Fuelab

NMCA JolietBradenton 2014

Recently we had the chance to sit down and talk with Doug Duell, a successful racer in NMCA Nostalgia Super Stock, and discuss drag racing. Here is what he had to say.

Q: When did you start racing?
A: In 1992 at age 31

Q: What got you into racing?
A: My Father got me into it. He ran Stock Eliminator in the NHRA.

Q: What was the first car you raced? What were some of the other cars you have raced?
A: I started with a ’67 Barracuda 383 in bracket racing. Then I moved onto Nostalgia Super Stock with a ’64 Plymouth Fury. I’ve been racing the DragnWagn (1964 Fury Wagon) since 2005.

Q: What associations have you raced in?
A: I’ve been racing in National Muscle Car Association, and also will soon be running a stocker in the NHRA – a 1969 Barracuda 440

Q: What have been your major racing successes over the past 5 years?
A: I was the NMCA Nostalgia Super Stock Points Champ 2009, 2010, 2012 – otherwise I was always in the top five

Q: Is your family involved in your racing efforts?
A: Yes, my wife helps out

Q: How long have you used Fuelab?
A: For the last five years

Q: Why did you start using Fuelab?
A: My friend Andy Warren was using Fuelab on his race car, and I was impressed by the workmanship of the products

Q: Was there a particular problem you were having that Fuelab solved?
A: My old fuel pump was worn out, and needed to be replaced. I wanted to upgrade to something more modern – so I moved up to a Fuelab fuel pump and regulator. I chose the Fuelab because it was more compact and lighter than other fuel pumps.

Q: How has Fuelab affected your racing success?
A: Fuelab provides reliable performance, and has made my fuel delivery system more reliable. I don’t have to worry about it. I’ve found sometimes fuel pumps can be problematic on race cars, but there are no problems with Fuelab.

Q: What Fuelab components do you use?
A: I use a Fuelab Prodigy fuel pump and regulator

Q: What do you see as the primary benefits of Fuelab products and company?
A: One of the primary benefits is the size of the fuel pumps. They are small and compact, so they make for easy installation. Another benefit is the reliability. There are no problems, no worry. I can concentrate on other systems on the car, and my driving.

Q: Where do you see yourself in racing in five years?
A: To still be racing in stock eliminator and NMCA. I love the travel and the competition.

Q: What do you do in your spare time?
A: In my spare time I like to travel, and go Scuba diving in the Carribean